If You Liked Utah’s Scenic Highway 12, You Will Love This Old Cattle Route: The Burr Trail Road

Photo of towering red cliffs along the Burr Trail Road in Utah by Peggy Mekemson.
Do towering red cliffs along the road get you excited? You will find them on the Burr Trail Road off Utah’s Scenic Highway 12. Plus a Singing Slot Canyon— and ever so much more. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)

I was doing research for our road trip over Utah’s Scenic Highway 12 when I came across a rave review for the Burr Trail, a narrow road that branches off from 12 in the small town of Boulder. It looked exactly like the kind of backroad adventure we like. It could take us all the way to Glen Canyon or even up to Capitol Reef National Park. We opted to explore the first 15 or so miles. The route got its start in the late 1800s as a way John Burr found for for moving cattle back and forth between their summer pasture near Boulder and their winter pasture in Glen Canyon.

We were wowed by the first few miles of the road— and then we dropped into Long Canyon. It blew our minds! I’ll start today’s post with photos of the canyon and then double back to pick up the road in.

The Burr Trail winds its way through the Grand Staircase-Escalante Monument. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)
Photo of Long Canyon along the Burr Trail Road by Curt Mekemson.
We were driving along the Burr Trail Road when suddenly it dropped into Long Canyon. It was obvious we were in for a treat. Note the neat way the left and right hand sides of the road are separated through Long Canyon.
Photo of how the Burr Trail is divided as it makes its way through Long Canyon by Curt Mekemson.
I took this photo to illustrate how the road was divided.
Photo of rock formation in the Burr Trail Road Long Canyon by Curt Mekemson.
The type of rock formations along the side of the road seemed endless.
Close-up of rock formation in the Long Canyon of Burr Trail Road by Peggy Mekemson.)
Their shapes reminded me of Tombstones. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)
In addition to the fascinating formations, the colors were riotous.
Photo of colorful rocks along the Burr Trail Road through Long Canyon by Peggy Mekemson.
Peggy took this close-up of another cliff. Green trees and shrubs all through the canyon added dramatic contrast to the reds, oranges and yellows.
Photo of colorful cliff along the Burr Trail Road through Long Canyon by Curt Mekemson.
I found these nearby. A hiking trail ran beside the cliff. Note the holes in the rock above.
Photo of holes in rock formation along the Burr Trail Road by Curt Mekemson.
We’ve found these holes in rock formations throughout the Southwest. Peggy loves them but I took this particular photo.
Picture of two interesting rock formations in the Long Canyon of Utah's Burr Trail Road by Peggy Mekemson.
There are two interesting rock formations for the price of one here. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)
Photo of peak-like rock formation found in the long Canyon section of Utah's Burr Trail Road by Curt Mekemson.
I took a photo of the second formation from a different perspective.
Photo of colorful rocks along Utah's Burr Trail Road through Long Canyon by Peggy Mekemson.
One has to love the brilliant colors of the Southwest. Burr Trail’s Long Canyon is full of them. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)
Will this seemingly tiny hole (probably 50 feet high) someday become a massive arch? It’s possible. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)
One of many different rock formations found along the Burr Trail Road through Long Canyon. (Photo by Curt Mekemson.)
Yet another interesting rock formation we found in Long Canyon.
Photo looking up near Singing Canyon along Utah's Burr Trail Road by Curt Mekemson.
Looking up led me to take this photo. We had pulled off the road to see why four cars were parked in the area. That’s a major crowd for Burr Trail Road.
Photo of Peggy Mekemson at the entrance to Singing Canyon along Utah's Burr Trail Road by Curt Mekemson.
“Come on, Curt,” Peggy urged me to join her in finding what had captured everyone’s attention.
Photo of Singing Canyon, a slot canyon along the Burr Trail road in Utah by Curt Mekemson.
An incredible slot canyon that towered 80 feet into the air. Peggy provides a good perspective on its size. It’s know locally as Singing Canyon because of its incredible acoustics.
Photo of ceiling of Singing Canyon along Utah's Burr Trail Road by Peggy Mekemson
Peggy turned her camera up and caught this photo of the ceiling…
Photo showing red, orange and purple rocks of Singing Canyon on Burr Trail Road by Peggy Mekemson.
And this. Note the deep purple as well as the orange and red colors.
Photo inside of slot canyon found along the Burr Trail Road in Utah taken by Curt Mekemson.
I focused on the slot canyons floor that was equally colorful.
Photo looking out from slot canyon, aka Singing Canyon, along the Burr Trail Road in Utah by Curt Mekemson.
Turning around, there was a light at the end of the tunnel/slot canyon, and it featured a tree lit up by the sun.
Photo of tree at exit of slot canyon along Utah's Burr Trail Road in Long Canyon by Peggy Mekemson.
Peggy took a closer photo of the tree. I liked the way the trunk and limbs stood out. Several more things caught our interest outside of Singing Canyon.
Photo of cotton wood outside of slot canyon on Utah's Burr Road by Curt Mekemson.
An ancient cottonwood that looked like it could star in a fantasy movie…
Stump that looks like a giant sling shot outside of Singing Canyon on Utah's Burr Trail Road by Curt Mekemson.
The world’s largest sling shot?
Strange example of rock erosion outside of Singing Canyon on the Burr Trail Road. Photo by Curt Mekemson.
And a very unusual example of rock erosion.
Photo of rock erosion inside a hole in the Sandstone along the Burr Trail Road in Utah by Peggy Mekemson.
Meanwhile, Peggy was finding her own definition of strange by peering into the holes in rocks she liked. The hole had its own example of Burr Trail scenery.
Photo of wall running along edge of Burr Creek Road in Long Canyon by Curt Mekemson.
I’ll conclude out journey through Long Canyon with a final view of the wall that runs along the edge of the road.
Photo of Rock formation near Boulder Town, Utah by Peggy Mekemson.
As I mentioned at the beginning, the Burr Creek Trail road had its own interesting rock formations. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)
Photo of scenic Burr Trail Road outside of Boulder Town, Utah by Curt Mekemson.
Even the roadside was scenic!
Photo of trees and shrubs growing along the scenic Burr Trail Road in Utah by Curt Mekemson.
I like the contrast of these trees and shrubs growing among the rocks alongside the road.
Photo of tree in front of a rock formation outside of Boulder Town, Utah on the Burr Trail Road by Peggy Mekemson.
Peggy captured this rock formation with a tree in front…
And a final Boulder Trail Road photo by Peggy. Next Friday’s Post. Finally, Bryce Canyon.

20 thoughts on “If You Liked Utah’s Scenic Highway 12, You Will Love This Old Cattle Route: The Burr Trail Road

  1. I lived in Utah back in the 80s and traveled the road then. I recall much controversy over the proposed paving of the road, considered necessary by many because of the treacherous,
    slippery, nature of the bentonite clay road surface when wet. Did they “compromise” and pave just one side of the road?
    One of my favorite posts, Kurt and Peggy.

  2. Thanks Curt. We have traveled across 12 several times but never were on the Burr Travel Road. That is Alie’s favorite part of the world [Canadian Rockies come in at number one for me] and when/if we ever get back on the road, we will certainly pull up your posts for ideas.

  3. We will certainly put this road on our list of side trips to take! Your photos are great – though it took my web browser quite a long time to download each of them! My connection must be particularly slow this AM!

      • I’m can see why you wanted to include lots of photos!
        Maybe it wasn’t the number of photos but the size of them that slowed me down! I know I have to resize my images to less than about 250 KB so that I can upload them in a timely manner. My WP Media Library says I’ve used 400 MB of space for 3100 photos!

  4. There’s not a word big enough for these big rocks! I’m so glad you two have the chance to prowl areas like this — we all profit from it. Of course I’m a little envious, but on the other hand, my travel juices have been pretty much evaporated by our heat. Like a good bit of the country, I’m waiting for October! By that time, I’ll be ready to roll, even if I don’t make it to the rocks!

    • Pretty amazing, huh, Linda. It is a treasure. Again, it’s another example where Bryce gets all the press so that is where everyone goes. (Not that Peggy and I are complaining about sharing the Burr Trail with only a dozen people instead of a thousand.)

      We were just noticing that the Applegate Valley is under severe fire watch. And we are learning to live with humidity. (Good thing I had all of that practice ever so long ago in Liberia.) We just returned from taking our grandkids to visit Williamsburg, Jamestown and Yorktown. Plenty of heat and humidity there as well. But everything I have read says that Texas has been just plain miserable.
      Come September we will be heading north. 🙂

  5. Yes, towering red cliffs along the road get me excited! Lol. Beautiful photos. I was especially interested in the stripes, and that slot canyon was immense. I’m glad Peggy was in there to give some perspective. The trail looks like and amazing find. 🙂

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