Rheinstein Castle: A Symbol of the Romantic Age… Saved Twice

Sitting on a rocky promontory some 270 feet above the Rhine River, Rheinstein Castle is considered a symbol of the Age of Romanticism.

Rheinstein’s history dates back to the 13th century when the castle was originally built to collect tolls and whip some of the local robber barons into line, i.e. they weren’t paying a percentage of their take to the local catholic bishops and the Holy Roman Emperor. By the 17th century the castle had fallen into ruins. But it was about to be saved. The Romantic Age was flourishing. Nature was idealized, science regarded with suspicion, and the past glorified. What better way to glorify the past than to rebuild a medieval castle. Or at least, that’s what Prince Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia thought. He went looking for a candidate and settled on Rheinstein. In 1823, he went to work.

Now, fast forward to1975. The Duchess von Mecklenburg had an important decision to make. Would she sell her 700 year old castle to the Hare Krishna religious sect or to an Austrian opera singer, Hermann Hecher. The Krishna group wanted to turn the castle into a private temple. Hecher wanted to preserve the castle’s cultural heritage. (I fantasized about the Hare Krishna devotees circling the keep and chanting, or Hecher standing on top while belting out an aria.) It would have been a quick decision for me: Preserve the castle’s cultural heritage for public enjoyment and education. It wasn’t so easy for the Duchess. The Hare Krishna folks were willing to pay 40% more. Whoever bought it, extensive renovation would be required. The castle was in serious need of saving again. Fortunately, for the thousands of people who have visited Rheinstein since 1975, including us, the duchess opted to sell the castle to Hecher. His family has been hard at work restoring the castle for three generations. It’s a labor of love. As one of the family members noted, “You don’t buy a castle to get rich.”

Uniword Boutique, our cruise boat line, offered a tour of the castle as one of our options. There was no doubt what decision the Mekemsons would make: Touring castles was a prime objective of our trip. Grandma insisted. The tour bus picked us up at the boat, took a ferry across the Rhine, and dropped us off at the castle gates. Visitors are encouraged to explore all of the nooks and crannies on their own. Off dashed the grandkids, happy to lead the parade. Except Ethan. Our daughter Tasha assigned him grandparent duty. Or rather, I should say, Grandpa duty. Tasha frets a lot. She knows my ways and worries at 79 I might wander off and just keep wandering. At 17, Ethan is the oldest and now towers over six feet. Every time I turned around, there he was. I chose to find it amusing rather than irritating. He’s a good companion. Still, I couldn’t resist ditching him on occasion. It’s my duty.

The towering Ethan is standing next to Peggy. From left to right are Tony, me, Cammie, Ethan, Peggy, and Connor. Tasha was taking the photo. The rest of the family was off exploring.

We wandered from room to room. The Hechers have done what they can to restore the castle to its historical status including searching Europe for era-appropriate furnishings. Some, such as the collection of tiny skulls with antlers, were downright weird. My blog today, will reflect our tour, working from the outside in.

The tower on the left was where we were standing when the photo above was taken. The narrow steel stairway was the way up.
Another view of the tower, the stairway, and the hanging basket.
Here’s a closeup of the basket. It was used as a fire basket signal that could be seen from nearby castles and repeated. I also read that it could be used as a prime location for placing people who refused to pay their toll, so they could contemplate the folly of their action.
This photo provides a perspective on the promontory that Rheinstein is built. One has the feeling that attacking from the front would be a bit daunting.
The grapevine is the focus here. Information on Rheinstein claims that it is 500 years old and still producing viable grapes for burgundy! Talk about well-aged wine… Grin.
A side view of the back of the castle.
Working our way around to the back.
The view from behind.
We were also attracted to this photogenic tower.
A view of the Rhine from the castle. A barge, riverboat and another barge can be seen working their way along the river. Fortunately, tolls are no longer an issue. Trade increased exponentially when they were eliminated in 1831. And now, it’s time to enter the castle.
I’d like to report that the restrooms had at least been modernized. Hanging over the edge and letting go was no longer a requirement or an option.
Photographs of Rheinstein Castle by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
Rooms had been tastefully decorated with antique furniture and flowers from the castle’s gardens. Note the harp in the corner. More later.
Photo by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
What castle would be complete without the dress of a princess on display? Light here was provided courtesy of stained glass windows. There are several in the castle.
Photo by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
As might be expected, faith was a common theme.
Demonstrating your faith was an important prerequisite for getting through the Pearly Gate.
Photo by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
Maybe the rules change once you are admitted. Not to harp on the subject, but I think this may be a more modern perspective.
Photos of Rheinstein Castle by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
Not a stained glass window! Tasha and Peggy as seen through glass that was obviously older than their combined age and then some.
Photo by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
This charging knight was carved into a chest. One wonders how fast the short legged horse could charge.
Photo by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
There was a great variety to the art. This modern version of the castle reminded me of an El Greco painting.
Maintaining the property would have been hot, hard work in the 1300s. A worker receives a welcome drink of water. Or maybe it was burgundy from the grapevines.
Photos of Rheinstein Castle by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
I wouldn’t want to encounter this fellow on a dark night. Or make that any time. He is not a boring boar.
Photos of Rheinstein Castle by photographers Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
A possible comment on my attempts at punning.
Photos of Rheinstein Castle by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
Dare I say something about spouting off…
Photos of Rheinstein Castle by Curt and Peggy Mekemson.
Coming from the western United States, I am familiar with hunters mounting the heads of the huge trophy animals they have shot on their walls as proof of their manly manliness. Believe me, when I say they would not mount these tiny fellows that are about fist size, unless, of course, they were extremely rare. Not sure what they are except an extremely small species of deer. Do you find them as weird as I did?
I’ll finish with this photo of the flag over Rheinstein Castle. May it continue to fly for another 700 years. Next up, we move away from castles for other views along the Romantic Rhine. (Or maybe, I’ll do a post on Devil’s Tower in Wyoming for variety. I just finished processing the photos.)

15 thoughts on “Rheinstein Castle: A Symbol of the Romantic Age… Saved Twice

  1. Thanks for sharing Rheinstein’s Castle with us Curt.
    What great experience and such rich history. love the castle and beautiful vistas and your cute picture of Peggy Tasha… I’ll look forward to more spouting off from you soon. Have a great Thanksgiving!!!
    💗

  2. “Visitors are encouraged to explore all of the nooks and crannies on their own…” (and probably without safety rails, and a load of lawyer’s fine print on the ticket.) Looks like fun.

    • Right you are, Dave. It’s refreshing to explore with the thought that we are responsible human beings. I was reminded of the legacy that lawyers leave us with as we have driven over America’s highways where it seems like every other huge billboard is an attorney urging you to sue someone. One is Las Vegas even specialized in hotel injuries. But I’m ranting. 🙂 The castle was a kick. –Curt

  3. You guessed right, Curt. European Roe Deer antlers are mounted there. Really eye-catching for someone who has lived their whole life in the Western US. I was so intrigued I had to do research. As Dave said, the best thing about this is that you could just take off and explore to your hearts content. Thank goodness the right family came into possession of this castle and continues to do the difficult work of restoring it. With all the visitors, half the money must be spent on constant repairs and improvements specifically related to tourists. This is a mind bogglingly gorgeous castle. The views of it, and from it are unparalleled. Thank you for showing this treasure to us.

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