A Bird’s Eye View of Dubrovnik… Armchair Travel in the Time of Covid-19

Continuing my armchair series on Dubrovnik, Peggy and I look down from the walls into the city providing a view of its colorful red roofs. Enjoy.

One of my favorite views into Dubrovnik, this one features the Church of St. Blaise on the left with it's mandatory statue of the saint holding a model of the city.
One of my favorite views into Dubrovnik, this one features the Church of St. Blaise on the right with its statue of the saint holding a model of the city. There was nothing blasé about Blaise, he was martyred for refusing to worship pagan gods and liked to preach to wolves and bears. Note the mechanical bell-ringer in the steeple on the left.

Walking the medieval walls that surround Dubrovnik provides a bird’s eye view across the roofs and down into the city. And what a view it is. Red tile roofs, narrow walkways, and imposing churches invite the visitor to pause and admire the unusual beauty of this town perched on cliffs above the Adriatic Sea.

Twenty years ago most of this beauty was destroyed as Yugoslavia lobbed shells into the city from surrounding hills. Dubrovnik held out, Croatian troops lifted the siege, and the residents proudly rebuilt their city. Today the only reminders of the siege are a few ruins that have yet to be rebuilt and bright red tiles that have yet to mellow with age.

Today’s blog is best reflected through photographs that Peggy and I took.

Looking down on Dubrovnik is like looking down on a sea of red. This photo is taken from Minceta Tower, the highest point on the wall. The Adriatic stretches across the top and the city's port is on the top left.
Looking down on Dubrovnik is like looking down on a sea of red. This photo is taken from Minceta Tower, the highest point on the wall. The Adriatic stretches across the top and the city’s port is on the top left.
This view of red tile roofs and cloudy skies features Dubrovnik's Cathedral on the left.
This view of red tile roofs and cloudy skies features Dubrovnik’s Cathedral on the left. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)
The contrast between new and older tiles is captured here. Many of the newer tiles represent repairs made after the Siege of Dubrovnik in 2000-2001. The trellis in the middle covers a garden, of which many are found through out the city nestled between buildings.
The contrast between new and older tiles is captured here. Many of the newer tiles represent repairs made after the siege of Dubrovnik in 2000-2001. The trellis in the middle covers a garden. Many are found throughout the city nestled between buildings.
Another view of old and newer tiles in Dubrovnik. This one features chimneys.
Another view of old and newer tiles in Dubrovnik. This one features chimneys.
A view looking down on Dubrovnik's port and St. John's fortress that guarded the  harbor against Venetian invasion during the Middle Ages. The towns clock tower is on the right. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)
A view looking down on Dubrovnik’s port and St. John’s fortress (now an aquarium and museum) that guarded the harbor against Venetian invasion during the Middle Ages. The town’s clock tower is on the right. Lokrum Island is at the top of the picture. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)
Peggy's view of an abandoned building.
Peggy’s view of an abandoned building.
My obligatory cat photo from Dubrovnik. I loved the contrast of the two benches that had been shoved together.
My obligatory cat photo from Dubrovnik. I loved the contrast between the cat and the two benches that had been shoved together.
A view down the Stradun, Dubrovnik's main street. The Franciscan Monastery is on the left.
A long view down the Stradun (Dubrovnik’s main street) looking toward the clock tower. The Franciscan Monastery is on the left.
I like this view because it shows what Dubrovnik's red tile roofs look like in the sunlight!
I like this photo because it shows what Dubrovnik’s red tile roofs look like in the sunlight!
A final view of Dubrovnik taken from the walls. This photo was shot through a window of one of the city's many guard towers.
A final view of Dubrovnik taken from the walls. This photo was shot through a window of one of the city’s many guard towers. I thought it made a rather nice frame.

NEXT BLOG: We climb down from the walls surrounding Dubrovnik and walk through the city.

18 thoughts on “A Bird’s Eye View of Dubrovnik… Armchair Travel in the Time of Covid-19

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    • Interesting article, Andrew. And a stark reminder of how the politics and ethnic rivalries of the area have had such a negative impact, not only on the region, but the world. –Curt

      • Ex Yugoslavia remains full of tensions. Last time in Croatia we drove to Montenegro. The hotel owner who had previously been very friendly asked where we were going and after we told her never spoke to us again. I hadn’t realised that it was the Montenegrans who had invaded Croatia and had bombed Dubrovnik. A lesson learned – no your history before you travel!

  1. We visited Dubrovnik some years ago and the crowds were intense. In fact I had included Dubrovnik in an article on over tourism recently. How quickly things can change.
    Hope this finds you and Peggy doing well.

    • Thanks, Sue. We are. Hiding out in our little sanctuary. As for Dubrovnik, we were lucky to be there at the very end of the season. Overcrowding has become a real problem of the modern age for popular, easy-to-get-to destinations. It’s a tough one, not only for a city like Dubrovnik on the cruise ship route, but a national park like Yosemite. (I saw a recent article on how happy the bears in Yosemite seem to be to have gotten rid of all the tourists!) –Curt

      • Curt I think wildlife all over the world is overjoyed. Dolphins swimming in Venice, lions sleeping on the road in South Africa and happy bears in Yosemite. Glad to know you and Peggy are both well.

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