For Glorious Walls, Visit Dubrovnik… The Armchair Series for Dreams of Future Travel

I am continuing my armchair series today and for the next for the next three posts as I revisit the fabulous walled city of Dubrovnik on the Adriatic Coast. Many of my followers will have visited this city. For you, let the memories begin, as they are for Peggy and me. If you haven’t been there, I suggest it would be a great reward for the self-isolation you have practiced during the battle against Covid-19. Start dreaming. The pandemic will pass.

The walled city of Dubrovnik is known as the Pearl of the Adriatic. The walls around the city are listed as a World Heritage Site.
The walled city of Dubrovnik is known as the Pearl of the Adriatic. The walls around the city are listed as a World Heritage Site. The Adriatic Sea is at the top of the photo.

OK, I’m in love. This walled city of Croatia on the Adriatic Sea is gorgeous.  Once upon a time Dubrovnik was a major sea power in the Mediterranean Sea. At another time, it was the first nation in the world to provide official recognition for the fledgling United States of America fighting for independence.

As recently as 1991 it was under a devastating siege by Yugoslavian forces that laid waste to much of the city’s renowned beauty.  Today it has rebuilt most of what was destroyed.

This is one of four blogs I did on Dubrovnik in 2013 and am reposting on my Armchair Series. First up is a look at magnificent medieval wall that surrounds the city and provides visitors with outstanding views of the Adriatic Sea and surrounding country. Second I will turn inward and look down from the walls on the city and its colorful tiled roofs. Third we will visit the city from street level. Finally, I want to feature some intriguing gargoyles we found in Dubrovnik. (Have I used enough superlatives?)

Any visit to Dubrovnik should include a walk around the mile plus (6,360 feet) wall that surrounds and protects the city. Considered to be one of the great fortification systems of the Middle Ages, the walls were named a World Heritage site in 1979. Reaching a maximum height of 82 feet, the walls were never breached during the 12th through the 17th century— providing five hundred years of peace and prosperity for the residents.

A fast walker can easily do the walk in an hour or so but plan on a more leisurely 2-3 hour stroll. You’ll need the extra time for photography, or just staring in awe.

This photo of the walls was taken from Minceta Tower, the highest spot on the walls.
This photo of the walls was taken from Minceta Tower, the highest spot on the walls. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)
This photo provides a great perspective on why enemies would have thought twice... or maybe a dozen times, before attacking Dubrovnik.
Here’s a perspective on why enemies would have thought twice— or maybe a dozen times— before attacking Dubrovnik.
If the walls weren't enough to discourage an invasion of Dubrovnik, the Fort of St. Lawrence stood on an opposite peninsula. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)
If the walls weren’t enough to discourage an invasion of Dubrovnik, the Fort of St. Lawrence stood on the opposite peninsula. BTW, is it just my imagination (admittedly wild) or does the fort look like it is resting on the back of a turtle? (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)
Another view of the Fort of St. Lawrence in Dubrovnik. It was a stormy day as shown by the waves from the Adriatic Sea breaking on the rocks.
Another view of the Fort of St. Lawrence in Dubrovnik. It was a stormy day as shown by the waves from the Adriatic Sea breaking on the rocks.
This photo looks up toward Minceta Tower, the highest point on the walls of Dubrovnik.
This photo looks up toward Minceta Tower, the highest point on the walls of Dubrovnik. The flag of Croatia is seen on the left.
Another perspective on the wall protecting Dubrovnik.
Another perspective on the wall protecting Dubrovnik.
A cannon's perspective looking out from the walls of Dubrovnik.
A cannon’s-eye-view looking out from the walls of Dubrovnik.
I liked this photo by Peggy with its dark sky, grey wall and red roof.
I liked this photo by Peggy with its dark sky, grey wall and red roof.
A statue of St. Blaise, the Patron Saint of Dubrovnik, looks out on the Adriatic Sea under a watch tower protecting the city from harm. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)
A statue of St. Blaise, the Patron Saint of Dubrovnik, looks out on the Adriatic Sea and protects the city from harm. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)
A final view of Dubrovnik wall. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)
A final view of Dubrovnik wall. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

NEXT BLOG: A journey around the walls of Dubrovnik looking down into the city.

26 thoughts on “For Glorious Walls, Visit Dubrovnik… The Armchair Series for Dreams of Future Travel

  1. Beautiful place. It’s on my list. Wish I’d gone there years ago before it got discovered. Thanks for sharing! I’ve heard places like this in recent years have been getting too many visitors; like Venice it must be very tough on the locals. Perhaps when these places reopen they can find a way to better balance the tourism they need with quality of life.

    • We were lucky to visit when there weren’t too many visitors, but I totally agree. One thing that would help would be limiting cruise ship visitors to 2-3 three times a week with only one cruise ship on any given day. I suspect people will be more reluctant to cruise in the future, at least for a little while! It’s up to the various sites to limit the number of visitors. They can still have a healthy economy without being over run. But will they say no to reducing some of their profit? –Curt

  2. An especially moving armchair travel for me, as we had planned to go there this year 😦 The trip wasn’t supposed to be until later so I’m hoping we can maybe still go, but not betting on it.

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